Recent Blog Posts

 

Tennis Elbow Self Treatment

Tennis elbow, technically known as lateral epicondylitis, is a fairly common condition not only for tennis players, but for anyone performing repetitive gripping movements. The muscles that control wrist extension, which form a common muscle tendon at the lateral elbow, become chronically inflamed due to repetitive micro-trauma. In our Beaverton chiropractic clinic, we see cases on a regular basis ranging from mild to debilitating, and have successfully treated all levels of injury. As sports chiropractors, our approach is always non-surgical, and non-pharmacological. Treatments in our Beaverton clinic include Active Release Technique and Graston instrument assisted soft-tissue therapy, both used to break down scar tissue, and increase blood flow to the site of injury, coupled with joint manipulation and exercise therapy. Our mission is to not only treat the injured tissue, but to look beyond the site of injury to uncover muscle imbalances, movements dysfunctions, and joint mobility issues that may be the cause.

Today's video highlights some of our favorite home therapy techniques for the treatment of tennis elbow. 

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Back In Motion & XTERRA Portland

The 2018 XTERRA Portland event was a great success, and I wanted to share a short video I made of the action.

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99 Hits

Posture Correction Series - Part 1: Mobility

Workstation, laptop, tablet, cell phone - it's our way of life. Unfortunately, too much of a good thing is, well, a bad thing. As the population becomes increasingly dependent on technology for both work and leisure time, the physical demands of our devises is having a dramatically negative impact on our musculoskeletal systems. Most notably, we are seeing a pattern of pronounced shoulder and trunk rounding. Know also as "upper crossed syndrome"

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The Short Foot Exercise - The Plantar Fasciitis Fix

For today's blog, Beaverton chiropractor, Dr. Adam Meisenhelder discusses foot pain and the short foot exercise.

For active runners, foot pain is an all too often partner on the road and trail.  Plantar Fasciitis, Achilles tendon pain and metatarsalgia are a few of the problems one can experience as a result of faulty foot and lower-leg mechanics.

The causes of these injuries are complicated, and include both biomechanical dysfunction and tissue overload.  Current thinking on the mechanism of plantar fasciitis is that the intrinsic foot muscles do a poor job of controlling forces going through the foot. If the stresses of running and walking aren’t distributed efficiently, we over stress the plantar fascia, triggering injury in the form of torn tissue, and pain. We then need to find a way to unload the stressed tissues. so, if weak or inhibited foot muscles are part of the problem then how do we correct this?

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